Button TextButton TextButton Text
 
 

 

 

Age Key For Trees

2 YR. S..........2 years in seedling bed
3 YR. S..........3 years in seedling bed

1-1 T.P..........1 year seedling bed and 1 year transplant bed

1-2 T.P..........1 year seedling bed and 2 year transplant bed

2-2 T.P..........2 year seedling bed and 2 year transplant bed

2-3 T.P..........2 year seedling bed and 3 year transplant bed

Potted Trees & Shrubs

Colorado Blue Spruce:

Grows over 35 ft.   Densely formed tree with stiff, silvery-blue to bluish-green needles.
(Click To Enlarge)  
Black Hill Spruce:

Grows over 35 ft.  Short, stiff dark green needles and a spicy scent.  Elevation 5500-6500 ft.
(Click To Enlarge)  
Norway Spruce:

Grows over 35 ft.  Fastest growing spruce with dark green needles and draping branches.
(Click To Enlarge)  
Balsam Fir:

The traditional Christmas tree.  Excellent fragrance with good needle retention.
(Click To Enlarge)  
Fraser Fir:

Often referred to as the Cadillac of the Christmas trees. Has excellent fragrance and needle retention.
(Click To Enlarge)  
White Pine:

Vigorous growing, open tree with long, soft bluish-green needles. Used in ornamental plantings.
(Click To Enlarge)  
Magenta Crab:

Pink flowers followed by small dark red fruits. The foliage is magenta colored and is an excellent tree for wildlife plantings.
(Click To Enlarge)  
Red Splendor Crab:

Red flower buds open into large deep pink single flowers. The fruit is dark and showy.
(Click To Enlarge)  
American Plum:

A small tree or large shrub. White flowers in early May. Edible fruits - red or yellow. Very hardy & drought resistant.
(Click To Enlarge)  
Eastern Arborvitae:

Fan-like glossy leaves provide year-round color. Forms a wind tight barrier when used for screening or as hedging.
(Click To Enlarge)  
Tamarack - American Larch:

A medium-sized tree, 40-80' tall, open pyramidal crown & shallow wide-spreading root system.
(Click To Enlarge)  
Birch - White (clump):

Moderate to fast growth with a mature height up to 70 feet.  Bark is tighter than Native White Birch.
(Click To Enlarge)